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Limited edition Mavic kit celebrates the Col d'Izoard

Joseph Delves
20 Jun 2017

The barren Casse Déserte provides inspiration for Mavic’s geometric designs

French brand Mavic have release a bundle of kit to coincide with this year’s Tour de France passing over the Col d'Izoard. At 2,360 metres the summit of the Izoard in France’s Hautes-Alpes sits high above the treeline. The last section of the climb passes through an area known as the Casse Déserte, which roughly translates as the ‘broken desert’.

Its dramatic barren landscape of weathered and exposed rock has provided the backdrop to some of the greatest battles in the history of the Tour de France.

This year the climb comes on Stage 18 and towards the conclusion of the race, meaning it should prove decisive to the final outcome.

To celebrate the mountain's inclusion French clothing and component maker Mavic, who are based in nearby Annecy, have released a range of limited edition kit.

Comprising shoes, jersey, and socks, their colour scheme echoes the hot blue sky that frequently hangs over the mountain in July, while the jutting diagonals in stone shades represent the sharp rocks that litter its upper reaches.

‘From the lush valleys to the barren mountain tops, the Col d'Izoard elicits memories of Tour de France drama and the awe of the changing landscape as the climb ascends,’ explained a spokesperson for Mavic.

All the limited edition pieces come from the brand’s established Cosmic range.

Their Izoard edition Cosmic Pro shoe features the brand’s twin ergo dial adjustment which offers micro tensioning and a quick and easy release.

At a claimed 240 grams they should be well suited to racing in the mountains. There’s also a pair of matching socks.

Up top the jersey features a streamlined cut and is composed of Ride Wick ST fabric which should offer improved moisture transfer, while inbuilt air mesh inserts on the sides provide additional ventilation.

Initially included in 1922 the Izoard was the first real mountain to be attempted as part of the Tour de France. This year marks the 35th time it’s been included.

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