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Is the Tour de Yorkshire becoming Britain's biggest race?

Joe Robinson
22 Sep 2017

Expansion of mens and women's race sees Tour de Yorkshire's stock rise

With the announcement that both the mens and women's additions of the Tour de Yorkshire will be increasing to four and two days respectively, the race has suddenly become an even more important fixture in the calendar. 

Successful since its inception in 2015, the multi-day race around Yorkshire has produced exciting racing and unpredictable outcomes. 

This has led it to become the most exciting race on British shores. With the addition of another day, the Tour de Yorkshire has overtaken the Tour of Britain as the UK's most important race. 

First of all, let's not take anything away from the Tour of Britain. This year saw a stellar field with some of the world's best sprinters in attendance. 

With it position in early September, the Tour of Britain has been the race of choice for perspective World Champions over the past few years who look to taper ahead of their battle for the rainbow jersey. 

Yet, despite the attraction of a top-class field, the route has left us wanting, failing to showcase the British Isles in its truest form.

Take this year for example. Eight stages saw seven bunch sprints, with Stage 5 the anomaly as it was an individual time trial.

Switch over to the the Tour de Yorkshire in May and we are presented with quite a contrast in racing. The unpredictable weather and heavy roads has led to exciting racing.

This year's edition went down to the wire, with eventual winner Serge Pauwels (Dimension Data) taking the overall victory on the final stage.

The excitement is also helped by the fact that Yorkshire boasts some of Britain's most beautiful countryside and biggest crowds.

Adding another day to both the mens and women's race shows a desire to grow and make this race more important than it is.

If ASO continue with their innovative stage designs, tackling some of Yorkshire's most feared climbs, the race will soon acquire cult status as one of the most difficult and interesting races in the season.

The Tour of Britain will remain the longest race on British shores, and the most covered, but with the expansion of the Tour de Yorkshire it will most likely lose it place as the most exciting.

Do not be surprised if in years to come we see the Tour de Yorkshire become the premium UCI event in the UK.