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Cycle Republic’s ‘Cyculator’ shows how much you could save by commuting by bike

Dan Alexander
26 Jul 2018

Using Google Maps API the cyculator summarises the financial and time benefits of riding your bike to work

Commuting to the office on public transport is unappealing at the best of times. Sweaty underground journeys in the sweltering heat and expensive, overcrowded trains which are often delayed, sometimes not running at all, are enough to frustrate even the most patient of commuters.

Cycling to work is the obvious alternative. It’s cheap, benefits your health and has the added incentive of bypassing the mind numbing journeys to work. Even more so for those who drive to work.

However, according to 2018 ONS statistics, it’s estimated that just 2.8% of commutes are made by bike.

In a bid to encourage more commuters to get riding, Cycle Republic’s 'cyculator' demonstrates the financial and time benefits of commuting by bike.

Cycle Republic estimate that the cost of maintaining your bike is £396 a year which is still cheaper than the cost of taking public transport or driving.

Even a short commute from Vauxhall to London Bridge produces a saving of £103 a year compared to the public transport equivalent, burning 68,160 calories in the process.

Riding the extra six miles a day adds up to a significant total, equivalent to cycling from London to Cairo each year.

Commuting from outside of Central London brings even bigger savings. Cycling to work in Westminster from Croydon saves you an estimated £1,753 a year and adds up to over 5,000 extra miles.

That’s twice the distance of the Tour de France each year or the equivalent of cycling from London to Tokyo.

Poor leadership in City Hall and loud shouting from the motor vehicle minority are still hindering the expansion of safe cycle routes and dedicated infrastructure in the capital.

More political will and a fair recognition of how cities made for people - those wanting to cycle and walk rather than drive everywhere - would help more people reap the rewards of commuting by bike.

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