Advertisement

Sign up for our newsletter

Advertisement

How to get a ride in the Tour de France neutral service car

Joe Robinson
22 Feb 2019

Mavic and Zwift team up to offer opportunity to ride in the peloton at this year's Tour

The chance to ride along in a neutral service car for a day at the Tour de France is almost a 'money can't buy experience'. We say almost, as with enough money just about anything is possible.

However, Mavic is giving you the the chance to spend a day in its neutral service car at a stage of this year's Grand Boucle and it won't cost you a single penny – just 52.2km of riding effort.

The French wheel manufacturer has teamed up with Zwift to host its L'Etape du Tour: Ride to Win event on Tuesday 26th February, from which one lucky finisher will win the chance to ride along behind the Tour peloton for a day.

The winner will also receive a set of Mavic Cosmic Pro carbon limited edition Tour de France wheels featuring a specially designed rim paying homage to the world's biggest cycling race, which retail for around £1,500.

Aside from the grand prize, three runners up will be offered entry to the otherwise sold-out L'Etape du Tour sportive this July and five will be given a Mavic Comete Ultimate helmet.

All you have to do in order to win the above is complete a 52.2km loop of Zwift's Watopia circuit next Tuesday. 

There will be three organised riders – 6am, 5.30pm and 8.00pm – which will be open to all Zwift users regardless of level. Entries can be found here.

The brand new route, called Bambino Fondon, is a rolling affair with 580m of climbing that includes an initial start on the Watopia KOM before a loop of the Mayan ruins and jungle and a summit finish atop the Volcano climb.

The online virtual ride plays as a training ride for this July's L'Etape du Tour, the annual sportive that mirrors a mountain stage of the that year's Tour de France.

This year's route will begin in Albertville before finishing at the summit of Val Thorens. The tough day in the saddle will see riders cover 4,600m of climbing in just over 135km.

Read more about: