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Over 1,000 riders brave terrible weather at 25-hour Red Bull Timelaps race

Joe Robinson
28 Oct 2019

Vitus Pro Cycling win overall prize as heavy rain and wind put riders through their paces

Over 1,000 riders beat testing weather and 25 hours of racing to complete the world's longest cycling race, the Red Bull Timelaps.

British Continental team Vitus Pro Cycling took the overall honours while Bianchi Dama took the women's prize as a mixture of teams and solo riders battled heavy rain and wind on the 6.7km circuit at Windsor Great Park.

Clapham Chasers secured the mixed prize while George Kirkpatrick and Tamala McGee impressed to win the inaugural solo competitions.

Overall winners Vitus Pro Cycling - made up of pro riders Chris McGlinchey, Mikey Mottram, Frederik Scheske and Timony Torrie - took the overall honours with 148 laps and a distance of 894km, eight laps more than closest rivals Paria RT, despite high winds and heavy rain battering the race in large parts.

Despite containing Team Ineos WorldTour rider Pavel Sivakov, the 'Ineos 3' team was only able to take sixth on the day despite their Russian pro covering eight laps of the smaller 4.5km loop during the race's 2am power hour.

In the women's race, Bianchi Dima beat InternationElles and Specialized UK into second and third respectively, covering 126 laps and 768km in the process. 

Talking after the race, Vitus's Mottram commented on how the race proved much more challenging than he initially believed it would.

'I was surprised by just how hard the race was. We started the whole thing doing 60-90 minute stints, but then from early Sunday, we started doing 2-hour shifts just because everybody wanted to do their last run and get warm,' said Mottram. 

'Red Bull Timelaps is certainly more challenging than you expect it to be, but definitely worth it.'

The most impressive results from the race, however, were those of Kirkpatrick and McGee who took the men's and women's solo prize.

McGee completed a full 79 laps in the women's race while Kirkpatrick covered 101 laps thanks to taking the risky decision not to sleep throughout the entire event.

'Obviously it’s a hell of a long time to be in the saddle. I had my brother and my cousin here and it quite simply would not have been possible without their support. They were always keeping me fuelled with food and keeping bottles filled up.'

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