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Prologo Dimension NDR saddle review

7 May 2020
Verdict:

If you like a short saddle, the Dimension is a good option, with the NDR version tested being padded enough for comfort

Cyclist Rating: 
Price: 
£109.99
For 
Reasonable level of padding • Sporty looks
Against 
Short format stops you shifting your weight when needed, such as on gravel descents

The eight saddle Prologo Dimension range offers a variety of unisex short saddle options for different uses. Fundamentally, they’re all based on the same platform, with a short 245mm length coupled to a not-too-narrow 143mm width. The exception to the rule is the Dimension Space, which expands the saddle width to 153mm.

Lots of saddle options - and TLAs

Prologo loves its acronyms, so the Dimension saddles are littered with them. First up is PAS, for Perineal Area System. That’s the brand’s name for its long central pressure relief cut-out. If it’s not designed well, I have found the cut-out in some saddles uncomfortable, but the Prologo Dimension NDR’s was fine, with a good width and smooth edges. I’m not convinced that cut-outs add much to airflow or cooling though.

Another acronym: CPC. Standing for Control Power Connect, Prologo uses this on its top-end saddles, although not the model of the Dimension NDR tested. It incorporates an array of small rubber protuberances, that help you to keep your position as you ride, let air flow between the saddle and your shorts and, Prologo says, give your rear end a massage to boot. It’s included in three of the Dimension saddles.

Buy now from BikeInnUk for £135

Next up is the rail material. Top of the tree is the lightweight Nack carbon rail, followed by Tirox lightweight steel alloy, then T4.0 chromoly steel.

And finally, the NDR stands for Endurance, with Prologo adding another 3mm to the depth of padding over the standard Dimension.

So what we have is the Dimension NDR endurance saddle on Tirox rails. At £109.99, it’s a mid-range option between the most expensive £219.99, 159g claimed weight, Dimension NDR CPC Nack and the cheapest 221g Dimension NDR T4.0, retailing at £89.99, with a couple of other options with CPC available mid-range too.

I weighed the test saddle at 198g - 12g heavier than Prologo’s claimed weight.

A good endurance option

The Dimension NDR is a comfortable saddle for longer rides. Fitted to an endurance road bike, it provided good support and enough padding to smooth out the road a bit, without my sitbones getting lost in the foam. The width also means that there’s enough surface area to spread the load, despite the central cut-out.

I didn’t notice the absence of CPC grippers in the covering. With its short length the Dimension NDR tends to limit the chances of slipping around, although I’ve found CPC a nice feature when I’ve tested other saddles which included it. It’s likely to be a boon to time triallists and triathletes too.

To give the Prologo Dimension NDR a sterner test, I also used it on a Cannondale Topstone gravel bike. A pretty good substitute for cobbles, dried out tractor treads as well as other bumps and bashes were well-enough cushioned.

What didn’t work so well off road was the short format, which limits your ability to shift your weight as you ride. That’s fine for road riding, where the range of forward and aft motion you’re likely to want is limited, but makes steeper off-road descents more awkward than a longer design and leaves you hanging off the back of the saddle.

Buy now from BikeInnUk for £135

If you’re not sure which saddle you need, like many saddle makers Prologo offers a fitting system. Called MyOwn, it measures the width of your sitbones, your flexibility and your BMI, which along with your riding characteristics is used by the Prologo dealer to recommend saddle options.

There’s a 60-day money-back guarantee if you don’t get on with your new saddle.

So if you’re after a short saddle, the Prologo Dimension offers a comfortable choice, with a wide range of options. And it’s a smart-looking saddle too - I particularly like the droop snoop front end that features on many of Prologo’s designs.

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