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Santini Tono Dinamo bibshorts review

1 Sep 2021
Verdict:

Highly comfortable aero shorts perfect for all-day rides

Cyclist Rating: 
Price: 
£170
For 
Exceptional chamois • Super breathability • Minimal seams • Firm hem grippers • Perfect waistband height • Good compression • All-day comfort
Against 
Tricky to pull on, but that’s nitpicking!

I’ve not yet reached the age when my wife needs to be worried that she’ll come home to find me sprawled at the foot of the stairs having taken a fall, but serious concerns for my coordination and health were raised the first time I kitted up to ride in the Santini Tono Dinamo bibshorts.

Being significantly more aero (ie, tight and compressive) in the leg than most of the kit I wear regularly, I raised one leg, inserted it into the shorts, pulled up the hem and the insanely firm gripper snagged firstly on my socks, then on my freshly shaved calf, causing much hopping around the room.

The hurried thump of spousal footsteps on the stairs, accompanied by a panicked, ‘Are you OK?’ came seconds after I’ve stumbled into the dressing table and knocked a heavy pot pourri bowl on to the floorboards.

My point being, these shorts are tight. Why labour this point at the outset? Because the difficulty you might encounter in pulling on the Santini Tono Dinamo bibshorts is the only conceivable drawback to them. They are simply fantastic, for numerous reasons…

 

Seamless transition

Once they’re on, the Santini Tono Dinamo bibshorts are cut to favour a crouched position, with minimal seams at the legs, a waistband that’s just high enough to cover the navel, and with wide, strongly elasticated bib straps that pull you into that crouch on the bike (if you attempt to stand bolt upright, you’ll feel them pulling you back down into a stoop).

The length of the legs is closer to the knees than some people might be used to, and there’s certainly no way those hems are deviating from your chosen position thanks to the insanely grippy honeycomb-shaped silicon grippers. I wouldn’t like to pull these shorts on with more than a few days of hair growth; they’ll do a good job of waxing any hair off your legs…

And, breathe

The Santini ‘Thunderbike Power’ fabric from which the Tono Dinamo bibshorts are contructed is a tightly-woven polyester/elastane mix which feels thicker than your average. However, the material is claimed by Santini to offer UPF 50+ protection from the sun, so that’s a definite bonus on these days of high summer.

Buy the Tono Dinamo bibshorts now from Santini

You might expect this compressive fit and thicker fabric to create heat build-up, but it’s simply not the case. The breathability on offer is excellent, and above the waist this ability to vent hot air is truly excellent. The back of the bib section has narrow, raw-cut edges and a gossamer-thin mesh material which spirits that clamminess away.

 

Go the distance

Although the look and feel of these shorts is borderline-racy, I took a six-hour day trip in them, and the comfort levels were through the roof.

The second-skin sensation of the Santini Tono Dinamo bibshorts almost makes your forget you’re wearing them, while the C3 chamois is up there with the best. It features anti-shock gel under the sit bones and carved multi-density foam that packs 10mm of padding at the tip. Santini recommends it for rides of up to eight hours, and I can confidently attest to its all-day ride suitability.

Aero, plain

The Santini Tono Dinamo bibshorts are available in four solid colours – black, grey, olive and blue – to match the colourscheme of the brand’s Eco Sleek Dinamo jersey. Not only is a matching top and bottom a cycling fashion plus-point, but this is also the best combination of aero riding kit I’ve used in years. And crucially, it doesn’t shout ‘FAST!’; it’s comfortable for hours in the saddle, supportive and classy.

Buy the Tono Dinamo bibshorts now from Santini

If going – or looking – quick is high on your list of priorities, the Santini Tono Dinamo bibshorts are a must-have.

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